Monday, October 02, 2006

hungry for doctrine

Yesterday in my sermon I shared the Methodist doctrine of how to use money. I was happily surprised by the joy with which it was received. A comment I received confirms to me that people are hungry for doctrinal teaching. We owe it to our people to teach them real Christian doctrine and not just serve up warm-fuzzy sermons. Here's the comment I received.
Hey Jason! This isn't a comment on your post, but on your sermon this morning about Money and John Wesley. My Sunday school class -- every person (well, actually two were dozing) -- thought your message was great, and although our lesson this morning was on Judges, we spent a lot of time talking about what you had to tell us -- Gain all you can, Save all you can and Give all you can. We should have a study sometime on John Wesley and his doctrines. He is more interesting than I thought.

Carol Herdien

11 comments:

JD said...

Jason,

Similar to the teaching that Dave Ramsey talks about in Financial Peace University which I am coordinating this fall. I am glad to hear that something else is being shared about money and its relationship with the church than a sermon about tithing when the annual giving campaign comes around. Good Job!

PAX
JD

Anonymous said...

Of course, it is a sermon about money during the annual giving campaign...

To be honest though, I dug deeper into it and read John Wesleys sermon but haven't finished analyzing it yet.

Holy Pirate said...

Now come on Pastor Jason, do you really expect us to take financial advice from a guy who died essentially broke?

Name it and claim it! Blab it and grab it! Flip That House! Master the Possibilities! Who Wants To Be A Millionaire!

If God wanted us to be poor, would he have invented the lottery?

Jason Woolever said...

anon is right. we are having a consecration sunday in two weeks. personally, i think taking a month out of the year to talk specifically about finances is pretty responsible.

Mike Rayson said...

and if any of you are looking at the 'give all you can' part of Wesley's message, feel free to address your checks to....

Mike Rayson Ministries....

hahahahaha.

Rick Warren of Saddleback came up with an interesting quote in one of his books some time back... and I reckon if Wesley had thought of it, he may have used it.

"It's not a sin to be rich, it's a sin to die rich".

(or something like that)

PAX

Mike

ps - those of you reading this that live near Jason, I hope you'll all coming to the revival later this month.

Jason Woolever said...

yes, pirate, you ought to come down to Pontiac for the Mike Rayson revival.

JD said...

Jason,

Since I do not attend your church, I did not know that, but hey, a Methodist can dream, can't he :)

PAX
JD

Jason Woolever said...

Hey JD. You can dream about a church that teaches about money more than one month a year if you want! I dream about a church where all members know what the Bible teaches about stewardship and practice the biblical tithe and give beyond it, and where we don't even have to spend a month a year trying to convince them to trust God with their finances!

JD said...

I hear that. After FPU and trusting God, being good stewards of His blessings, we have not looked back since. We still discuss money amongst each other, but not about what God calls us to do.

That is the one thing that my parents cannot understand about my wife and I when it comes to giving. Their main commment is that God does not want us to give so much that you have to struggle. My reply always is, because we give, and trust God, we don't struggle. Not by our power but His. They don't understand it.

PAX
JD

Jason Woolever said...

yeah, didn't paul say something about foolishness to the greeks?

Anonymous said...

Jason,

I commend you for teaching sermons on Christian doctrine that are sorely needed.

As a Southern Baptist, I can appreciate United Methodist churches that run 40 Days of Purpose, Beth Moore Bible Studies, such as The Patriarchs and Daniel, some even teach Bible Study on the book of Revelation from a pre-tribulation dispensational viewpoint. (That last comment might raise some eyebrows).

I appreciate the Disciple Bible Study offerings. But if I want to really study the Standqrd Sermons of Wesley --- not many UMC pastors want to do that...

I hope you can be an example to other UMC pastors that being Wesleyan/Methodist means we should be doctrinal.

In Christ,

John Flores
Frisco, Texas